Tue, 10th May 2016 12:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art ('Courageous')

 
  Lot 21
 
Lot 21 - RICHARD HENRY NEVILLE-CUMMING (BRITISH, FL....

21

RICHARD HENRY NEVILLE-CUMMING (BRITISH, FL....

Sold for £4,712
Estimated at £2,500 - £4,000

(Please note the sold price includes buyer's premium at 24%)


Condition report
Generally quite good overall. Light staining left hand side and small scratch. Light staining right hand side. Needs reframing.

We are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of this property. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Charles Miller Ltd is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD “AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE.

 
RICHARD HENRY NEVILLE-CUMMING (BRITISH, FL. 1888-1891)
The steamer 'Ameer' and the barque 'Sindia' off Gibraltar
signed and dated 'H Neville-Cumming/1889' (lower right)
pen and brown ink and watercolour heightened with white
25½ x 50½ in. (64.8 x 128.3 cm.)

Provenance: with The Boydell Galleries, Liverpool.

Although her career provided no particular excitement, Ameer has assumed her small place in shipping history as the first steamer to be ordered for the venerable firm of Brocklebanks when the company realised that the changeover from sail had become inevitable. Built by Harland & Wolff at Belfast in 1889, Ameer was designed as a four-masted steamer and given a barquentine rig to augment her single screw. Registered at 4,127 tons gross (2,689 net) and measuring 400½ feet in length with a 45 foot beam, she was engined by her builders and had a cruising speed of 10 knots. Launched on 24th August 1889 and completed that October, she entered service on the London - India via Suez route and, as the first steamer in the fleet, was commanded by Captain Ray, the company's Marine Superintendent. In 1906 she was transferred to Jenkins' Shire Line, in which Brocklebanks had a half-share, and renamed Cardiganshire, the name she retained when she was transferred again to the Royal Mail Line's fleet in 1907. Sold by Shire to Japanese owners in 1911, she was thereafter renamed on several more occasions before being scrapped in Hong Kong in 1923.