Tue, 3rd Nov 2015 12:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art ('Encounter')

 
Lot 57
 

57

DEATH OF NELSON, 21st OCTOBER 1805<br/>a rare and...

DEATH OF NELSON, 21st OCTOBER 1805
a rare and early Osborne plaque depicting the death of Nelson in the cockpit of H.M.S. Victory, handmade in plaster, finished with wax and then hand-painted in shades of brown, marked AO (for Arthur Osborne), 19 x 24in. (48 x 61cm.), as made and attractively mounted in a deep, glazed frame case for display

Osborne plaques were produced in Faversham, Kent, from 1899-1965. The business was founded by Arthur Osborne and all plaques were marked 'AO' until his death in 1943. There are considerable colour variations but those which were predominantly painted in brown all pre-date 1930. The plaques invariably depict well-known buildings, historical events or famous personalities. The usual size is normally in the region of 6 x 9in but are often even smaller. No example depicting any subject of a size comparable to the one offered here has been discovered by the cataloguer, and it seems very likely that it was a special commission for the Trafalgar centenary celebrations in 1905.

Sold for £496
Estimated at £400 - £600

(inc. buyer's premium of 24%)


 
DEATH OF NELSON, 21st OCTOBER 1805
a rare and early Osborne plaque depicting the death of Nelson in the cockpit of H.M.S. Victory, handmade in plaster, finished with wax and then hand-painted in shades of brown, marked AO (for Arthur Osborne), 19 x 24in. (48 x 61cm.), as made and attractively mounted in a deep, glazed frame case for display

Osborne plaques were produced in Faversham, Kent, from 1899-1965. The business was founded by Arthur Osborne and all plaques were marked 'AO' until his death in 1943. There are considerable colour variations but those which were predominantly painted in brown all pre-date 1930. The plaques invariably depict well-known buildings, historical events or famous personalities. The usual size is normally in the region of 6 x 9in but are often even smaller. No example depicting any subject of a size comparable to the one offered here has been discovered by the cataloguer, and it seems very likely that it was a special commission for the Trafalgar centenary celebrations in 1905.