Wed, 25th Apr 2012 12:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art (Anzac)

 
  Lot 10
 

10

FOLLOWER OF THOMAS WHITCOMBE, BRITISH 19TH...

FOLLOWER OF THOMAS WHITCOMBE, BRITISH 19TH CENTURY
The frigate action between the 'Phœbe' and 'L'Africaine' 19th February 1801
Oil on panel. A set of three
Each 17 x 24¼in. (43 x 61.5cm.)
(3, a set)

At 4pm on the 19th February 1801, H.M.S. Phœbe (36) under Captain Robert Barlow spotted an unknown vessel whilst patrolling off Gibraltar; attempting to flee, the French frigate L'Africaine (40) under Commodore Saulnier pressed on more sail. By 7.30pm Phœbe had caught up, forcing her opponent to clear for what was to become one of the bloodiest frigate actions of the Napoleonic Wars - L'Africaine was crammed with men and munitions intended to reinforce the French army in Egypt. The French broadsides were hastily fired to little or no effect, whereas the Phœbe's first well-aimed broadside wrought devastation. A furious action ensued at pistol shot for the next two hours, ending at 9.30pm when, with over five feet of water in the hold, most of her guns dismounted and her decks piled with casualties (of a complement of 715, 185 were killed outright - including three surgeons dressing wounds in the cockpit - and 125 were wounded), L'Africaine finally struck her colours. Barlow was knighted for his efforts, and L'Africaine was absorbed into the Royal Navy where she gave many years' good service under the name Amelia.

Sold for £2,480
Estimated at £2,000 - £3,000

(inc. buyer's premium of 24%)


Condition Report
Cleaned and re-varnished. Slight retouching to edges.

We are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of this property. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Charles Miller Ltd is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD “AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE.

 
FOLLOWER OF THOMAS WHITCOMBE, BRITISH 19TH CENTURY
The frigate action between the 'Phœbe' and 'L'Africaine' 19th February 1801
Oil on panel. A set of three
Each 17 x 24¼in. (43 x 61.5cm.)
(3, a set)

At 4pm on the 19th February 1801, H.M.S. Phœbe (36) under Captain Robert Barlow spotted an unknown vessel whilst patrolling off Gibraltar; attempting to flee, the French frigate L'Africaine (40) under Commodore Saulnier pressed on more sail. By 7.30pm Phœbe had caught up, forcing her opponent to clear for what was to become one of the bloodiest frigate actions of the Napoleonic Wars - L'Africaine was crammed with men and munitions intended to reinforce the French army in Egypt. The French broadsides were hastily fired to little or no effect, whereas the Phœbe's first well-aimed broadside wrought devastation. A furious action ensued at pistol shot for the next two hours, ending at 9.30pm when, with over five feet of water in the hold, most of her guns dismounted and her decks piled with casualties (of a complement of 715, 185 were killed outright - including three surgeons dressing wounds in the cockpit - and 125 were wounded), L'Africaine finally struck her colours. Barlow was knighted for his efforts, and L'Africaine was absorbed into the Royal Navy where she gave many years' good service under the name Amelia.