Wed, 25th Apr 2012 12:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art (Anzac)

 
  Lot 11
 

11

Keep for now, maybe do private sale<br/><br/>JOHN...

Keep for now, maybe do private sale

JOHN SCOTT (FL. 1844-1866)
The French steamer 'Paris' off the mouth of the Tyne bound for Hamburg
Signed and dated 'J. Scott / 1856' (lower right)
Oil on canvas
26 x 38¼in. (66 x 97.2cm.)

The iron-screw passenger/cargo steamer Paris was built at Newcastle by Mitchell & Co. in 1856 for Schuller & Co. Registered at 413 tons gross (281 net), she measured 181 feet in length with a 24 foot beam, and this portrait of her was clearly commissioned by her owners or her first master (Capt. F. Vasse) to mark her completion. No further details of her career are available at the time of writing.

Estimated at £7,000 - £9,000


Condition Report

Gallery condition.

We are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of this property. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Charles Miller Ltd is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD “AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE.

 
Keep for now, maybe do private sale

JOHN SCOTT (FL. 1844-1866)
The French steamer 'Paris' off the mouth of the Tyne bound for Hamburg
Signed and dated 'J. Scott / 1856' (lower right)
Oil on canvas
26 x 38¼in. (66 x 97.2cm.)

The iron-screw passenger/cargo steamer Paris was built at Newcastle by Mitchell & Co. in 1856 for Schuller & Co. Registered at 413 tons gross (281 net), she measured 181 feet in length with a 24 foot beam, and this portrait of her was clearly commissioned by her owners or her first master (Capt. F. Vasse) to mark her completion. No further details of her career are available at the time of writing.