Thu, 17th Jul 2008 12:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art (Phoenix)

 
  Lot 19
 

19

A technical profile bound manuscript of the...

A technical profile bound manuscript of the First Class barbette "Majestic" class battleship H.M.S. Hannibal, 1896
comprising ten double pull-out leaves, the first with a full list of specifications, the remaining nine technical ink and watercolour drawings of profile and deck views, hull shapes and details of boilers and ammunition chambers etc., bound with quarter calf marbled boards with title label

6½ x 9¼in. (16.5 x 23.5cm.)

One of the ten "Majestic" class First Class battleships - the largest ever built at 14,900 tons, Hannibal was launched on 28th April 1896 at Pembroke Dock. She mounted 4-12in., 12-6in. and 18-12pdr guns and measured overall 421 feet with a 75 foot beam. Her reciprocating engines could produce 16 knots under normal conditions and also powered electrical hoists and lamps throughout. Crewed by a complement of 672, Hannibal never saw action and was sold from the service in 1920.

The volume offered here may have been a naval architect's student piece, or possibly produced on board by a talented midshipman to supplement his log. The drawings are of a very high standard and remain in exceptionally good condition.

Sold for £310
Estimated at £300 - £400

(inc. buyer's premium of 24%)


 
A technical profile bound manuscript of the First Class barbette "Majestic" class battleship H.M.S. Hannibal, 1896
comprising ten double pull-out leaves, the first with a full list of specifications, the remaining nine technical ink and watercolour drawings of profile and deck views, hull shapes and details of boilers and ammunition chambers etc., bound with quarter calf marbled boards with title label

6½ x 9¼in. (16.5 x 23.5cm.)

One of the ten "Majestic" class First Class battleships - the largest ever built at 14,900 tons, Hannibal was launched on 28th April 1896 at Pembroke Dock. She mounted 4-12in., 12-6in. and 18-12pdr guns and measured overall 421 feet with a 75 foot beam. Her reciprocating engines could produce 16 knots under normal conditions and also powered electrical hoists and lamps throughout. Crewed by a complement of 672, Hannibal never saw action and was sold from the service in 1920.

The volume offered here may have been a naval architect's student piece, or possibly produced on board by a talented midshipman to supplement his log. The drawings are of a very high standard and remain in exceptionally good condition.