Wed, 26th Oct 2011 12:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art (Implacable)

 
  Lot 19
 

19

THOMAS LUNY (LONDON 1759-1837 TEIGNMOUTH)<br/>The...

THOMAS LUNY (LONDON 1759-1837 TEIGNMOUTH)
The Wreck of the East Indiaman 'Dutton' at Plymouth Sound, 26 January 1796
Oil on canvas
24 x 34in. (61 x 86.5cm.)

The National Maritime Museum at Greenwich has a slighter larger version of this picture, catalogue number BHC 3298, which depicts more of the citadel on the left side, and has a cutter passing off Dutton's bows and is signed and dated 1821. An old typed note pinned to the back of this example states it is signed for 1835.

The East Indiaman Dutton was built in Barnard's Yard on the Thames at Deptford and launched on 13th July 1781 bearing the name Director. Measured at 762 tons and 116 feet in length with a 35 foot beam, she was owned by Henry Rice who, for reasons unknown, renamed her Dutton prior to completion. Her first master, Captain James West, accepted her when ready for sea and she sailed from Portsmouth, as part of a large convoy, on her maiden voyage to China via the Coromandel Coast of India on 6th February 1782. Back in Home Waters in May 1784, four further round trips to the East - under various masters - followed during the ensuing decade until, on 27th July 1795, she was hired by the British government to act as a troop transport for an expedition to the West Indies. In company with the fleet, she left Plymouth on 6th October 1795 but was forced to return due to an outbreak of disease on board which affected most of the troops she was carrying.

Arriving back in Plymouth Sound on 25th January 1796, she dragged her anchors in a severe gale the following day and ran ashore below the Citadel's flagstaff where the heavy seas soon broke her back and rendered her a total loss. Pellew, then stationed at Plymouth, was driving to dinner when he passed the catastrophe unfolding below. Springing from his carriage he promptly boarded the stricken vessel when all her officers had deserted her. By his presence and authority, and the skilful use of a rope stretched betwixt ship and shore, Pellew and a group of unnamed boatmen saved the lives of everyone aboard, a feat which earned him not only his baronetcy but also a degree of national fame.

Edward Pellew, later Viscount Exmouth (1757-1833), one of the greatest frigate captains of his time, was born in 1757. the son of Samuel Pellew, the commander of a Dover packet. Entering the Royal Navy in 1770, he served in the American War of Independence and, in 1793, captured the first French frigate of the Revolutionary War for which exploit he was knighted. Created a baronet for his gallantry in saving the crew and passengers of the Dutton, the next year he achieved considerable fame for his daring frigate attack on the French 74-gun Droits de l'Homme which resulted in her complete destruction. Earning official recognition by preventing a mutiny In the Bantry Bay squadron in 1799, he was later promoted Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief in the East Indies in 1804 where he destroyed the Dutch fleet in 1807. Subsequently Commander-in-Chief in both the North Sea (1810) and the Mediterranean (1811), he was appointed Admiral of the Blue in 1814 and a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath the next year. Created Viscount after his success at Algiers in 1816, his last post was as Commander-in-Chief at Plymouth from 1817-21. Promoted Vice-Admiral of the United Kingdom in 1832, he died the following year.

Sold for £8,060
Estimated at £8,000 - £10,000

(inc. buyer's premium of 24%)


 
THOMAS LUNY (LONDON 1759-1837 TEIGNMOUTH)
The Wreck of the East Indiaman 'Dutton' at Plymouth Sound, 26 January 1796
Oil on canvas
24 x 34in. (61 x 86.5cm.)

The National Maritime Museum at Greenwich has a slighter larger version of this picture, catalogue number BHC 3298, which depicts more of the citadel on the left side, and has a cutter passing off Dutton's bows and is signed and dated 1821. An old typed note pinned to the back of this example states it is signed for 1835.

The East Indiaman Dutton was built in Barnard's Yard on the Thames at Deptford and launched on 13th July 1781 bearing the name Director. Measured at 762 tons and 116 feet in length with a 35 foot beam, she was owned by Henry Rice who, for reasons unknown, renamed her Dutton prior to completion. Her first master, Captain James West, accepted her when ready for sea and she sailed from Portsmouth, as part of a large convoy, on her maiden voyage to China via the Coromandel Coast of India on 6th February 1782. Back in Home Waters in May 1784, four further round trips to the East - under various masters - followed during the ensuing decade until, on 27th July 1795, she was hired by the British government to act as a troop transport for an expedition to the West Indies. In company with the fleet, she left Plymouth on 6th October 1795 but was forced to return due to an outbreak of disease on board which affected most of the troops she was carrying.

Arriving back in Plymouth Sound on 25th January 1796, she dragged her anchors in a severe gale the following day and ran ashore below the Citadel's flagstaff where the heavy seas soon broke her back and rendered her a total loss. Pellew, then stationed at Plymouth, was driving to dinner when he passed the catastrophe unfolding below. Springing from his carriage he promptly boarded the stricken vessel when all her officers had deserted her. By his presence and authority, and the skilful use of a rope stretched betwixt ship and shore, Pellew and a group of unnamed boatmen saved the lives of everyone aboard, a feat which earned him not only his baronetcy but also a degree of national fame.

Edward Pellew, later Viscount Exmouth (1757-1833), one of the greatest frigate captains of his time, was born in 1757. the son of Samuel Pellew, the commander of a Dover packet. Entering the Royal Navy in 1770, he served in the American War of Independence and, in 1793, captured the first French frigate of the Revolutionary War for which exploit he was knighted. Created a baronet for his gallantry in saving the crew and passengers of the Dutton, the next year he achieved considerable fame for his daring frigate attack on the French 74-gun Droits de l'Homme which resulted in her complete destruction. Earning official recognition by preventing a mutiny In the Bantry Bay squadron in 1799, he was later promoted Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief in the East Indies in 1804 where he destroyed the Dutch fleet in 1807. Subsequently Commander-in-Chief in both the North Sea (1810) and the Mediterranean (1811), he was appointed Admiral of the Blue in 1814 and a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath the next year. Created Viscount after his success at Algiers in 1816, his last post was as Commander-in-Chief at Plymouth from 1817-21. Promoted Vice-Admiral of the United Kingdom in 1832, he died the following year.