10th May, 2016 12:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art ('Courageous')

 
  Lot 213
 

213

A RARE AND FINE DOUBLE THEODOLITE BY MATTHEW...

A RARE AND FINE DOUBLE THEODOLITE BY MATTHEW BERGE, LONDON, FORMERLY OWNED BY THOMAS, FIRST BARON DUNDAS, GOVERNOR OF THE FORTH AND CLYDE CANAL COMPANY AND PROMOTOR OF WILLIAM SYMINGTON'S STEAM BOAT TRIALS, CIRCA 1805
constructed in lacquered brass with silvered scales, signed and inscribed on the main plate M. Berge, London / Lord Dundas, bubble levels, compass with jewelled pivot, telescope with blanking nut, lower telescope mounted on separate axis, secondary base with screw levelling and threaded removable tripod feet, contained within original fitted shaped wooden box of issue with two telescope tubes, adjusting instrument and key -- 14½ x 11½ x 8¼in. (37 x 29x 21cm.)

Thomas, Lord Dundas (1741-1820) the educated and well-connected "nabob of the north" was a hugely significant figure in Scottish and Northern English politics and culture almost until the day he died. As a friend of the Prince of Wales, Lord Dundas enjoyed an active social life, being a member of Brooks's Club, the United Service Club, the Society of Dilettanti and the Society of Antiquaries. From 1793 to 1813 he was the effective commander of the Yorkshire militia, and was Lord Lieutenant and Vice-Admiral of Orkney and Shetland between 1794 and 1820. An enthusiastic agricultural improver, he spent his income from rents on draining and enclosing land, experimenting with new crops and breeds and building water- or horse-powered threshing mills. As governor of the Forth and Clyde Navigation Company (1786-1816), he presided over the canal's completion and the creation of Grangemouth and Port Dundas. He also persuaded the company to test the first practical steam-tug, the Charlotte Dundas - named for a daughter. Despite its early promise, concerns over bank erosion were not addressed and the project foundered. Matthew Berge succeeded Jesse Ramsden in 1800 and for a time signed his instruments "Berge, Late Ramsden". This example has a more flamboyant signature now obscured by a plate securing knob and had to be re-signed underneath, but was probably used by Dundas until he stepped down as Governor of the Canal in 1813.

Sold for £8,680
Estimated at £6,000 - £8,000

(inc. buyer's premium of 24%)


 
A RARE AND FINE DOUBLE THEODOLITE BY MATTHEW BERGE, LONDON, FORMERLY OWNED BY THOMAS, FIRST BARON DUNDAS, GOVERNOR OF THE FORTH AND CLYDE CANAL COMPANY AND PROMOTOR OF WILLIAM SYMINGTON'S STEAM BOAT TRIALS, CIRCA 1805
constructed in lacquered brass with silvered scales, signed and inscribed on the main plate M. Berge, London / Lord Dundas, bubble levels, compass with jewelled pivot, telescope with blanking nut, lower telescope mounted on separate axis, secondary base with screw levelling and threaded removable tripod feet, contained within original fitted shaped wooden box of issue with two telescope tubes, adjusting instrument and key -- 14½ x 11½ x 8¼in. (37 x 29x 21cm.)

Thomas, Lord Dundas (1741-1820) the educated and well-connected "nabob of the north" was a hugely significant figure in Scottish and Northern English politics and culture almost until the day he died. As a friend of the Prince of Wales, Lord Dundas enjoyed an active social life, being a member of Brooks's Club, the United Service Club, the Society of Dilettanti and the Society of Antiquaries. From 1793 to 1813 he was the effective commander of the Yorkshire militia, and was Lord Lieutenant and Vice-Admiral of Orkney and Shetland between 1794 and 1820. An enthusiastic agricultural improver, he spent his income from rents on draining and enclosing land, experimenting with new crops and breeds and building water- or horse-powered threshing mills. As governor of the Forth and Clyde Navigation Company (1786-1816), he presided over the canal's completion and the creation of Grangemouth and Port Dundas. He also persuaded the company to test the first practical steam-tug, the Charlotte Dundas - named for a daughter. Despite its early promise, concerns over bank erosion were not addressed and the project foundered. Matthew Berge succeeded Jesse Ramsden in 1800 and for a time signed his instruments "Berge, Late Ramsden". This example has a more flamboyant signature now obscured by a plate securing knob and had to be re-signed underneath, but was probably used by Dundas until he stepped down as Governor of the Canal in 1813.