Wed, 29th Oct 2014 12:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art (Wizard)

 
  Lot 26
 

26

Ø BATTLE OF CAMPERDOWN, A RARE COMMEMORATIVE...

Ø BATTLE OF CAMPERDOWN, A RARE COMMEMORATIVE FAN, 1798
a splendid commemorative paper fan titled "The Camperdown Fan, or the Glorious 11th Octr. 1797", published March 20th 1798, by Reben, No. 42 Pall Mall, printed in monochrome with three portrait medallions of Admirals Duncan, de Winter and Onslow interspersed with thirteen different vignettes of ships (9), verse (2) and nautical motifs (2), top edge bound in gilt paper and with ivory lower sticks, mounted for display in a rectangular glazed case -- 13 x 20in. (33 x 51cm.)

Any fans which commemorate the British naval victories of the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars are considered to be extremely rare, and most of the handful of examples recorded celebrate Nelson's final and greatest triumph at Trafalgar. In this context, it should be noted that neither the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich nor the National Museum of the Royal Navy at Portsmouth holds a single fan relating to Admiral Lord Duncan and/or his victory at Camperdown. Similarly, none are held in the country's largest private collection at the specialist Fan Museum, also located in Greenwich, and indeed no example has so far been traced in any other public collection.

Following the French occupation of Holland soon after the outbreak of the Revolutionary Wars, the Royal Navy suddenly found itself having to face the not inconsiderable Dutch fleet in addition to the naval forces of France herself. Adopting the usual strategy of blockading all the enemy's ports, a powerful squadron under Admiral Duncan was sent to stand off the Texel and thereby prevent the Dutch either menacing the security of Britain or simply harrying English merchantmen. Duncan mounted his blockade throughout the summer of 1797 but was ordered home for a refit early in October. Leaving several frigates to maintain a watch, he had barely anchored in Yarmouth Roads when a despatch boat arrived with the news that the Dutch fleet had taken advantage of his absence and put to sea. Weighing anchor immediately, Duncan sped back to the Dutch coast to prepare for battle and engaged the enemy fleet just after midday on 11th October, three miles NW of Kamperduijn (Camperdown). The two fleets each had sixteen ships-of-the-line, but the Dutch had more frigates and also the advantage of position. Duncan, in H.M.S. Venerable, attacked the Dutch in two columns and a furious action ensued lasting several hours. The Dutch flagship Vrijheid attracted some of the bitterest fighting and by the time Admiral de Winter surrendered her at about 3.15pm., she was a total wreck and he himself was the only unwounded man aboard her. Eight Dutch men-o'war and a frigate had already surrendered with the result that when their flagship struck her colours, the battle was effectively ended. Casualties on both sides were very heavy and the Dutch prizes, two of which sank during the journey back across the North Sea, were all so badly damaged that none were fit for further service. It was not only a decisive victory for Duncan, but it also marked the end of Dutch sea power and the eclipse of the Dutch navy as a significant force in European history.

Sold for £1,488
Estimated at £1,500 - £2,500

(inc. buyer's premium of 24%)


Condition Report
The extreme lower section of one paper fold torn and thus lacking, but otherwise in excellent condition.

We are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of this property. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Charles Miller Ltd is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD “AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE.

 
Ø BATTLE OF CAMPERDOWN, A RARE COMMEMORATIVE FAN, 1798
a splendid commemorative paper fan titled "The Camperdown Fan, or the Glorious 11th Octr. 1797", published March 20th 1798, by Reben, No. 42 Pall Mall, printed in monochrome with three portrait medallions of Admirals Duncan, de Winter and Onslow interspersed with thirteen different vignettes of ships (9), verse (2) and nautical motifs (2), top edge bound in gilt paper and with ivory lower sticks, mounted for display in a rectangular glazed case -- 13 x 20in. (33 x 51cm.)

Any fans which commemorate the British naval victories of the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars are considered to be extremely rare, and most of the handful of examples recorded celebrate Nelson's final and greatest triumph at Trafalgar. In this context, it should be noted that neither the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich nor the National Museum of the Royal Navy at Portsmouth holds a single fan relating to Admiral Lord Duncan and/or his victory at Camperdown. Similarly, none are held in the country's largest private collection at the specialist Fan Museum, also located in Greenwich, and indeed no example has so far been traced in any other public collection.

Following the French occupation of Holland soon after the outbreak of the Revolutionary Wars, the Royal Navy suddenly found itself having to face the not inconsiderable Dutch fleet in addition to the naval forces of France herself. Adopting the usual strategy of blockading all the enemy's ports, a powerful squadron under Admiral Duncan was sent to stand off the Texel and thereby prevent the Dutch either menacing the security of Britain or simply harrying English merchantmen. Duncan mounted his blockade throughout the summer of 1797 but was ordered home for a refit early in October. Leaving several frigates to maintain a watch, he had barely anchored in Yarmouth Roads when a despatch boat arrived with the news that the Dutch fleet had taken advantage of his absence and put to sea. Weighing anchor immediately, Duncan sped back to the Dutch coast to prepare for battle and engaged the enemy fleet just after midday on 11th October, three miles NW of Kamperduijn (Camperdown). The two fleets each had sixteen ships-of-the-line, but the Dutch had more frigates and also the advantage of position. Duncan, in H.M.S. Venerable, attacked the Dutch in two columns and a furious action ensued lasting several hours. The Dutch flagship Vrijheid attracted some of the bitterest fighting and by the time Admiral de Winter surrendered her at about 3.15pm., she was a total wreck and he himself was the only unwounded man aboard her. Eight Dutch men-o'war and a frigate had already surrendered with the result that when their flagship struck her colours, the battle was effectively ended. Casualties on both sides were very heavy and the Dutch prizes, two of which sank during the journey back across the North Sea, were all so badly damaged that none were fit for further service. It was not only a decisive victory for Duncan, but it also marked the end of Dutch sea power and the eclipse of the Dutch navy as a significant force in European history.