Wed, 31st Oct 2012 12:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art (Cochrane)

 
  Lot 27
 

27

A LAUNCH BOARD FOR THE FIRST CLASS BATTLESHIP...

A LAUNCH BOARD FOR THE FIRST CLASS BATTLESHIP DUNCAN (1901)
painted overall and inscribed Success to the "DUNCAN.", the reverse inscribed I saw this ship launched 21st Mar 1901 E.T. Adams -- 9½ x 96¾in. (24 x 246cm.); photographs and data
(a lot)

Provenance: E.T. Adams (naval architect and amateur photographer); Bernard Cheese (executor of Adams' estate); Vendor (acquired from Cheese mid 1970s)

The nameship of a class of six, Duncan was built at the Thames Iron Works and laid down in 1899. Displacing 15,200 tons (deep load), they were built in response to increased naval output from Russia and France. Sacrificing armour for speed, their two-shaft four-cylinder triple-expansion engines fired by twenty four Belleville boilers could generate 18,000hp, giving a maximum of 19 knots, and were famously good steamers. Operating in the Mediterranean Squadron based at Malta from 1904-5 and 1908-12, they were still front line vessels in the early days of World War I (despite the advances made with Dreadnoughts) and formed part of the 3rd Battle Squadron at Scapa Flow. Transferred to the Third Detached Squadron in 1916, she fought against Greek Royalists and landed Royal Marines in Athens on December 1st. In February 1917 she was put in reserve at Chatham and used as an accommodation ship. Placed on the disposal list in March 1919, Duncan was broken up in 1920.

Sold for £744
Estimated at £400 - £600

(inc. buyer's premium of 24%)


Condition Report
Fine/strong overall condition.

We are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of this property. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Charles Miller Ltd is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD “AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE.

 
A LAUNCH BOARD FOR THE FIRST CLASS BATTLESHIP DUNCAN (1901)
painted overall and inscribed Success to the "DUNCAN.", the reverse inscribed I saw this ship launched 21st Mar 1901 E.T. Adams -- 9½ x 96¾in. (24 x 246cm.); photographs and data
(a lot)

Provenance: E.T. Adams (naval architect and amateur photographer); Bernard Cheese (executor of Adams' estate); Vendor (acquired from Cheese mid 1970s)

The nameship of a class of six, Duncan was built at the Thames Iron Works and laid down in 1899. Displacing 15,200 tons (deep load), they were built in response to increased naval output from Russia and France. Sacrificing armour for speed, their two-shaft four-cylinder triple-expansion engines fired by twenty four Belleville boilers could generate 18,000hp, giving a maximum of 19 knots, and were famously good steamers. Operating in the Mediterranean Squadron based at Malta from 1904-5 and 1908-12, they were still front line vessels in the early days of World War I (despite the advances made with Dreadnoughts) and formed part of the 3rd Battle Squadron at Scapa Flow. Transferred to the Third Detached Squadron in 1916, she fought against Greek Royalists and landed Royal Marines in Athens on December 1st. In February 1917 she was put in reserve at Chatham and used as an accommodation ship. Placed on the disposal list in March 1919, Duncan was broken up in 1920.