Wed, 31st Oct 2012 12:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art (Cochrane)

 
  Lot 32
 

32

A BELL FROM H.M. SUBMARINE SARACEN, 1942<br/>of...

A BELL FROM H.M. SUBMARINE SARACEN, 1942
of typical form, the front inscribed in black-filled lettering P.247 1942, the reverse with the broad arrow mark, complete with clapper and sally, the bell -- 11 x 11in. (28 x 28cm.)

H.M.S. Saracen was built at Cammell Laird and launched on 16th February 1942. Her original designation was to have been P213 but there was resistance against having an unlucky '13' in the number, so she became P247 - which still added up to 13. She was named Saracen in January 1943 and was issued with a named bell (this lot, which has many strike marks, becoming redundant). Her short career started auspiciously when she sank U335 in the North Sea on 3rd August 1942 - one of the two survivors died when he refused to be rescued. Latterly she sank the Italian submarine Granito, the sub-chaser Maria Angelette and several axis merchantmen and convoys. Her end came on 14th August 1943 when, cruising off Bastia, Italy, she was spotted by the Italian corvettes Minerva and Euterpe who promptly depth-charged her. Forced to the surface, her crew evacuated and scuttled her to prevent capture. More recently in September 2008 the families of crewmen from Saracen were invited to Corsica to witness the unveiling of a memorial to British secret agents who helped establish the Corsican Resistance, and to the submarine that landed them, Saracen. A plaque commemorating her already existed in the fortress at Bastia, where the crew were taken after her sinking.

Sold for £1,860
Estimated at £1,500 - £2,000

(inc. buyer's premium of 24%)


Condition Report
In good overall order with most of the original black filling present to the lettering; the inside rim of the bell has evidence of considerable usage with many strike marks suggesting the bell may have been removed at a refit, perhaps for a smaller one.

We are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of this property. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Charles Miller Ltd is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD “AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE.

 
A BELL FROM H.M. SUBMARINE SARACEN, 1942
of typical form, the front inscribed in black-filled lettering P.247 1942, the reverse with the broad arrow mark, complete with clapper and sally, the bell -- 11 x 11in. (28 x 28cm.)

H.M.S. Saracen was built at Cammell Laird and launched on 16th February 1942. Her original designation was to have been P213 but there was resistance against having an unlucky '13' in the number, so she became P247 - which still added up to 13. She was named Saracen in January 1943 and was issued with a named bell (this lot, which has many strike marks, becoming redundant). Her short career started auspiciously when she sank U335 in the North Sea on 3rd August 1942 - one of the two survivors died when he refused to be rescued. Latterly she sank the Italian submarine Granito, the sub-chaser Maria Angelette and several axis merchantmen and convoys. Her end came on 14th August 1943 when, cruising off Bastia, Italy, she was spotted by the Italian corvettes Minerva and Euterpe who promptly depth-charged her. Forced to the surface, her crew evacuated and scuttled her to prevent capture. More recently in September 2008 the families of crewmen from Saracen were invited to Corsica to witness the unveiling of a memorial to British secret agents who helped establish the Corsican Resistance, and to the submarine that landed them, Saracen. A plaque commemorating her already existed in the fortress at Bastia, where the crew were taken after her sinking.