Tue, 6th Nov 2018 11:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art ('Speedy')

 
  Lot 35
 

35

EUROPEAN SCHOOL, 18TH-19TH CENTURY

EUROPEAN SCHOOL, 18TH-19TH CENTURY

The Maltese Knights Hospitaller armed carrick 'Santa Anna' shortly after her launch with knights and dignitaries in attendance, circa 1522

Oil on canvas

48 x 33½in. (122 x 85cm.)

Although precise technical detail for this ship is scant, by all accounts she was a remarkable ship in many ways and must have represented a considerable investment on the part of the ancient order of Knights Hospitaller who ordered her construction in Nice. When launched in 1522 she had six decks (two of which were armoured), was sheathed in lead below the waterline, equipped with a forge, bakery and 'garden' which was suspended from her stern. She could carry five hundred marines in addition to her crew and all were housed in roomy messes. During her brief career she altered the balance of power in the Mediterranean and in 1531 single-handedly defeated a Turkish squadron of twenty-five ships. A year later, under the command of Andrea Doria, she seized Koroni and Patras, the twin Turkish forts guarding the entrance to the Gulf of Corinth and went on to capture or destroy several dozen Barbary Corsair pirate ships. She was even briefly deployed as a wheat carrier where her 900 ton carrying capacity proved very useful. Perhaps, however, the overheads of maintaining such a large vessel were too much and in 1540, just eighteen years after launch, she was condemned and broken up. The large 'clock tower' seen by the fo'c's'le has remained something of an enigma with opinion divided over whether it was an early attempt at longitude (a conventional pendulum being useless at sea), a depth sounder or perhaps a mechanical log.

Sold for £6,820
Estimated at £2,000 - £4,000

(inc. buyer's premium of 24%)


Condition Report

Relined; scattered retouching.


We are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of this property. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Charles Miller Ltd is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD “AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE.

 

EUROPEAN SCHOOL, 18TH-19TH CENTURY

The Maltese Knights Hospitaller armed carrick 'Santa Anna' shortly after her launch with knights and dignitaries in attendance, circa 1522

Oil on canvas

48 x 33½in. (122 x 85cm.)

Although precise technical detail for this ship is scant, by all accounts she was a remarkable ship in many ways and must have represented a considerable investment on the part of the ancient order of Knights Hospitaller who ordered her construction in Nice. When launched in 1522 she had six decks (two of which were armoured), was sheathed in lead below the waterline, equipped with a forge, bakery and 'garden' which was suspended from her stern. She could carry five hundred marines in addition to her crew and all were housed in roomy messes. During her brief career she altered the balance of power in the Mediterranean and in 1531 single-handedly defeated a Turkish squadron of twenty-five ships. A year later, under the command of Andrea Doria, she seized Koroni and Patras, the twin Turkish forts guarding the entrance to the Gulf of Corinth and went on to capture or destroy several dozen Barbary Corsair pirate ships. She was even briefly deployed as a wheat carrier where her 900 ton carrying capacity proved very useful. Perhaps, however, the overheads of maintaining such a large vessel were too much and in 1540, just eighteen years after launch, she was condemned and broken up. The large 'clock tower' seen by the fo'c's'le has remained something of an enigma with opinion divided over whether it was an early attempt at longitude (a conventional pendulum being useless at sea), a depth sounder or perhaps a mechanical log.

Auction: Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art ('Speedy'), Tue, 6th Nov 2018

Page turning catalogue here

Downloadable bid form here

Main View and Sale Venue:
25 Blythe Road
London, W14 0PD

Large Object View and Post-Sale Collection:
6 Imperial Studios
3-11 Imperial Road
London, SW6 2AG

 

Press enquiries: Suzanne Trisk press@charlesmillerltd.com

Viewing

Saturday, 3rd November
(12noon-5pm)
Sunday, 4th November
(12noon-5pm)
Monday, 5th November
(10am-5pm)
Tuesday, 6th November
(10am-11am - limited view only)

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