Thu, 17th Jul 2008 12:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art (Phoenix)

 
  Lot 47
 

47

The bridge bell from the Canadian-Pacific...

The bridge bell from the Canadian-Pacific Liner Empress of Russia, 1912
the 7½in. diameter bell cast in brass with red-filled lettering over a semi circle with additional decoration, now mounted on an oak stand, complete with clapper and pull

11in. (28cm.) high.

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co, Govan, Empress of Russia was launched on 28th Aug.1912, she displaced 16,810 gross tons, was 570ft long with a 68ft beam and, powered by quadruple screws, cruised at a speed of 19 knots. With accommodation for 284 1st, 100 2nd and 800 steerage class passengers she was a handsome addition to the Canadian-Pacific fleet for the trans-Pacific service. Converted to an armed merchant cruiser during the Great War, she formed part of the squadron blockading German merchant ships in the Philippines and later transferred to the Indian Ocean where she met with the Australian cruiser H.M.A.S. Sydney and took aboard 230 survivors from the German cruiser Emden. In Oct.1915 she was released from government service, refitted at Hong Kong and returned to the trans-Pacific service on 12th Feb.1916 but was requisitioned again briefly in early 1918 to carry American troops to Europe. She continued trans-Pacific sailings until Dec.1940 when, after her 310th voyage, she was used for trooping Australian and New Zealand Air Force recruits to Canada for their initial training and she was also involved in the North Africa landings in 1943. Employed thereafter on special duties, on 8th Sep.1945 she was gutted by fire at Barrow and was broken up by T. W. Ward & Sons.

Sold for £2,232
Estimated at £1,200 - £1,800

(inc. buyer's premium of 24%)


 
The bridge bell from the Canadian-Pacific Liner Empress of Russia, 1912
the 7½in. diameter bell cast in brass with red-filled lettering over a semi circle with additional decoration, now mounted on an oak stand, complete with clapper and pull

11in. (28cm.) high.

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co, Govan, Empress of Russia was launched on 28th Aug.1912, she displaced 16,810 gross tons, was 570ft long with a 68ft beam and, powered by quadruple screws, cruised at a speed of 19 knots. With accommodation for 284 1st, 100 2nd and 800 steerage class passengers she was a handsome addition to the Canadian-Pacific fleet for the trans-Pacific service. Converted to an armed merchant cruiser during the Great War, she formed part of the squadron blockading German merchant ships in the Philippines and later transferred to the Indian Ocean where she met with the Australian cruiser H.M.A.S. Sydney and took aboard 230 survivors from the German cruiser Emden. In Oct.1915 she was released from government service, refitted at Hong Kong and returned to the trans-Pacific service on 12th Feb.1916 but was requisitioned again briefly in early 1918 to carry American troops to Europe. She continued trans-Pacific sailings until Dec.1940 when, after her 310th voyage, she was used for trooping Australian and New Zealand Air Force recruits to Canada for their initial training and she was also involved in the North Africa landings in 1943. Employed thereafter on special duties, on 8th Sep.1945 she was gutted by fire at Barrow and was broken up by T. W. Ward & Sons.