Tue, 3rd Nov 2015 12:00

Maritime and Scientific Models, Instruments & Art ('Encounter')

 
  Lot 89
 

89

AN HISTORICALLY INTERESTING SHIP'S BELL FROM...

AN HISTORICALLY INTERESTING SHIP'S BELL FROM H.M.S. LOCUST (1939)
nickle-plated with black filled lettering, regulation crown top and red painted interior (lacks clapper) -- 11in. (28cm.) high

Launched by Yarrow of Scotstoun and completed in 1940, Locust was one of four 'Dragonfly' Class river gunboats. Displacing 715 tons (deep load), they measured 196ft 6in., steamed at 17kts and carried a crew of 74. Relatively lightly armed with two 4in. quick-firing guns and one 3.7in. howitzer, Locust was later augmented with three 20mm. and twenty depth charges. In August 1942 she played a lead rôle in Operation Rutter - better known as the Dieppe Raid or the Battle of Dieppe. Commanded by Robert Ryder, (who in March had participated in the very successful St. Nazaire Raid,) the Dieppe Raid contrasted poorly - of the 6000 allied (mostly Canadian) troops landed, including 200 Commandos from Locust, 3,367 were killed or wounded on the beaches. The Royal Navy lost thirty-three landing craft and one destroyer, the Royal Air Force 106 aircraft, mostly to flak, compared with just 46 of the Luftwaffe. The sober lesson learned was that the Allies could not hope to invade mainland Europe for a long time, but when Operation Overlord was finally put into practice in 1944, Locust participated and, despite being hit by shellfire, survived the War. She was decommissioned in May 1946 and placed in reserve, being sold for breaking at Newport in 1968.

Sold for £1,054
Estimated at £700 - £900

(inc. buyer's premium of 24%)


Condition Report
Fine condition, lacks clapper.

We are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of this property. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Charles Miller Ltd is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD “AS IS” IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE.

 
AN HISTORICALLY INTERESTING SHIP'S BELL FROM H.M.S. LOCUST (1939)
nickle-plated with black filled lettering, regulation crown top and red painted interior (lacks clapper) -- 11in. (28cm.) high

Launched by Yarrow of Scotstoun and completed in 1940, Locust was one of four 'Dragonfly' Class river gunboats. Displacing 715 tons (deep load), they measured 196ft 6in., steamed at 17kts and carried a crew of 74. Relatively lightly armed with two 4in. quick-firing guns and one 3.7in. howitzer, Locust was later augmented with three 20mm. and twenty depth charges. In August 1942 she played a lead rôle in Operation Rutter - better known as the Dieppe Raid or the Battle of Dieppe. Commanded by Robert Ryder, (who in March had participated in the very successful St. Nazaire Raid,) the Dieppe Raid contrasted poorly - of the 6000 allied (mostly Canadian) troops landed, including 200 Commandos from Locust, 3,367 were killed or wounded on the beaches. The Royal Navy lost thirty-three landing craft and one destroyer, the Royal Air Force 106 aircraft, mostly to flak, compared with just 46 of the Luftwaffe. The sober lesson learned was that the Allies could not hope to invade mainland Europe for a long time, but when Operation Overlord was finally put into practice in 1944, Locust participated and, despite being hit by shellfire, survived the War. She was decommissioned in May 1946 and placed in reserve, being sold for breaking at Newport in 1968.